Clinton Anderson: Foal Training – Downunder Horsemanship
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Clinton Anderson: Foal Training – Downunder Horsemanship

August 24, 2019


(upbeat music) – Good day, mate, Clinton Anderson here from Down Under Horsemanship, and I’d like to welcome
you back to another show. Well, today, we’re gonna be talking about one of my favorite subjects, which is training young
horses or foal training, okay. People ask me all the time, they say, Clinton, when do you start
working with your foals? When do you start teaching the method? And the answer is from the very beginning. When they open their little eyes, I wanna teach them two things. One, first thing I wanna teach a baby foal as soon as he’s born is
humans are not gonna hurt you, we’re not your enemy. The second thing I wanna
teach a baby foal is not only am I not gonna hurt you, but I need you to respect me, I need you to move out of
my space when I ask you to. So to me the ideal time to start
working with your horses is the younger the better. As soon as they’re born so to speak, we’ll rub them down, touch
them, desensitize them, get them used to humans that we are not the predator
that instinct says that we are. When I do tours all over the country, we get lots and lots of
problem horses at clinics and tours all over the world, okay. And these horses are big
and stout and robust, and they’ve had these behavioral issues for many, many years. Can they be fixed with the method? The answer is absolutely yes, but why let it get to that bigger problem, start when they’re little. Start when you can guide them. Young horses learn so quickly, so the quicker you get your hands on them and teach them to be soft and supple, respectful, not be fearful,
how to give to the pressure, how to give to the halter, the better the whole
partnership comes along and the quicker it comes along. It’s like a fresh blackboard. So on today’s show, we’re
gonna be teaching you some of the most important lessons that you need to be
able to teach your foal up to six months of age. Our foal training kit covers
them when they’re first born all the way to two years of age. So basically anything
to do with the horse’s first two years of education is going to be covered
in the foal training kit. We’re not gonna be obviously
be able to cover everything in the foal kit in today’s TV show, but we’re gonna be covering some of the most important
steps of his career. (upbeat music) – I’m Clinton Anderson and I have a method for training horses. Getting horses to behave is simple, it’s training people
that’s the real trick. Join me as I tackle some of
the most challenging situations with problem horses and
with problem owners. (upbeat music) So one of the first lessons
I wanna teach my horse is respect without fear. You need your horses to be respectful, no matter what age they are, but respect will not work very well if the horse is fearful of you, okay. So there’s a fine line there obviously between respect and fear, but it’s very, very important that you got the horse respectful, you’ve got him to give you two eyes, but if he’s fearful and worried about you, he won’t learn the
information very well at all. So to begin with how do
we gain a horse’s respect? Well, in the very beginning
with the baby foal, I’m gonna teach him by
yielding his hindquarters, getting his hindquarters
to move laterally, then I’m gonna teach him to
yield his forequarters away. When you get control of
each end of your foal, okay, and you teach them to be respectful, they start to get submissive. See, that’s the part that
people don’t understand. When your foals get respectful and use the thinking side of their brain, they become quiet, they get submissive, they get relaxed, they get
comfortable being around you. (upbeat music) In this series, mate,
we’re going to be using a three-month old filly,
her name is Miley, and she is gonna be our
student for all of the goals for that this particular series. So the first goal that
we want to show everybody is going to be yield the
hindquarters of touch and rub. Okay, we’ve got a string
around the foal’s neck to stop them walking forward, and with my hand I wanna barely be able to touch the horse’s hindquarters
with just my fingertips and have her pivot on a frontend and yield the hindquarters. Notice that her frontend
is staying relatively still and her hindquarters is going
around her forequarters. Now the mare that’s out here with her, this is not Princess in Diamonds, this is a recipient mare, I usually get about six to seven embryos out of Princess in Diamonds every year, so this is not her real
mother, but she did raise her. There, I love that. I love that when I just barely touch them and they disengage that
hindquarters, okay. We’ll go around the other side. This is the very start of getting your foals to
yield that hindquarters. A rope around their neck stops
them from walking forward. There, I like that. There we go, and then rub her to a stop. Good girl, she did great. (upbeat music) So to begin with, I’m just
gonna move her over here. Okay, just like that. And I want to try to get her
to disengage her hindquarters, kinda like yield the
hindquarters stage one, just like we do with the adult horses where we get the stick
and tap with rhythm, except instead of using a
driving tapping sensation, we’re gonna use steady
pressure with our fingertips. I’m gonna get my fingers
kinda like a pitchfork, okay, and I’m gonna press her
on the side of the butt, I’m gonna touch first, she doesn’t move, press,
then push, then dig. And as soon as her butt swings away, even a little bit of a step, I’m gonna reward her, okay, so the string around her neck would just stop her from
moving forward, okay. So I’m gonna touch, press, push, dig, dig, dig, there she moved away one step. Touch, press, there, rub her to a stop. Touch and rub, yield the hindquarters. Touch, press, touch, press, there it is, there’s a step right there. And then she kinda got a little worried, frightened just then. (mumbles) Pull on that neck a little bit here. Okay. Now right there is a little step. There’s the one right there. Now I liked it how she kind of bent her head towards me right then. That’s the first time
she is on this right eye bent her head towards me
and kind of acknowledged me. She has been kind of looking away a lot. Touch, press, push, there’s a step right there, see that right there. Good girl. Okay, and you know, mate, that would be probably about
all I’m gonna do for her, for her first session. (upbeat music) – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. (upbeat music) – [Clinton] Disposing of your
manure in your horse farm is a very important task and something that I take very seriously. Whether you’ve just got two horses or you’ve got up to 40 or 50 horses, ABI have a manure
spreader designed for you. It takes care of your pastures and make sure that a waste product turns out to be a great
fertilizing for your field. When you want the very best for you and your ranch, make sure
you go to ABIequine.com to check out their line
of innovation products, they’re the very best. (upbeat music) – [Man] Hey, mate, if
you’re looking for a fun and inspiring way to
challenge your horsemanship, then join me for a three-day
horsemanship clinic, so I can help you become
a better horseman. At each clinic I work
with only 20 participants, teaching them the fundamentals groundwork and riding exercises. My clinicians would join me to ensure everybody makes progress
and receive one-on-one help. Spectators are welcome to watch all three days of the clinic. We’ll also have our retail store setup with all of my products and kits. So, mate, if you wanna learn
the method from me personally, sign-up to participate or get
your spectator tickets now and I’ll see you on the road, mate. (upbeat music) – [Clinton] The next
way that I gain control of my foal’s feet is
yield that forequarters. When you teach a baby foal
to yield their forequarters and move away from pressure, they become submissive and relaxed. (upbeat music) The next goal, mate, is to get your horse to yield their forequarters
of touch and rub. If I get my fingertips on
her neck and on her shoulder, she should yield that forequarters 360 degrees around the hindquarters. And then when I rub her to a stop, she relaxes and knows that
that’s passive body language. Active, touch with my fingers, and have that forequarters step across. That’s it, we’ll do it on the other side. Touch her with those fingers, there. I want a real light horse. This is the foundation of your spin. Her full brother, Whisky in Diamonds, he could turn really fast. Well, this is how we started it with him when he was a baby foal we did the exact same things we’re doing with her. I love that how light she is. Now I’m gonna rub her to a stop, go from active body language to passive. Good girl. (upbeat music) One more thing I wanna show you here is a little bit of touch and rub, steady pressure on forequarters. I’ve got my hand on the side
of her jaw and on her shoulder, touch, press, push, there, dig, rub her. Get those forequarters to yield. Touch, press, push, dig, dig. There it is, there is
that step right there. This is the foundation of a spin, okay. All of my foals from the, there is a step, from the beginning learn how
to yield that forequarters. There is a good step. Even now she kinda cheat a little bit and go to drink halfway through it, I’m still gonna reward that step across. Touch, press, push, there, and then rub her. Touch, there we go, uh-huh, huh, because you’d be amazed how quickly once these foals realize
you’re not gonna hurt them, and they start getting quiet, the next thing they start
doing is getting pushy. They wanna know can they move
your feet, so I wanna start. There we go, getting that
frontend to move away. Even though she’s kind of throwing the head up there a little bit, I don’t worry about that too much. There’s a good step, but all that kind of stuff
just takes care of itself. There you go, you’re all confused here. Right now let’s yield the hindquarters, there we go, not bad at all. Okay, so this would be a
good place to quit her. She is nice and relaxed, okay. Quite a bit more
improvement than yesterday, quite a bit more
improvement than yesterday. Okay, mate, so now you’ve got an idea of the importance of gaining
control of the rear end, gaining control of the forequarters. Once you get control of
each end of your horse, you’re well on your way (laughs) to getting that horse respectful and being a great partner for you for the rest of the
exercises in the method. So people ask me all the time what do you change with a baby foal compared to an adult horse? Well, as a general rule, not a lot, except the only difference is, is when they’re really little I have a smaller concept stage, meaning that I don’t look for big chunks of improvement in every single lesson, I just look for a little
bit of improvement, get the horse to understand
the basic concept and then build on it the next day. It’s not that baby foals are not smart, it’s just that they can’t absorb quite as much information as
an adult horse so quickly. They get confused quicker. So you have to do a really good
job of exaggerating to teach and refine as you go along, but exaggerate in the beginning, get them to understand the
basic concept of the lesson, that’s my only goal. (upbeat music) – [Man] Hay is not for horses, they deserve Standlee
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as shown in the basics, now it’s time to put those
principles into practice. Get out of the arena and get on the trail. This all new supplement will show you how to apply the method on the trail. You get 10 instruction packed DVDs and two hardcover books. That’s over $800 worth of
training for only $399. Get up, get out and get on the trail. (upbeat music) – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. (upbeat music) – [Clinton] So a common
question I often get asked is, Clinton, do I need the colt starting kit or the foal training kit? Well, that’s pretty easy. If the horse is under two years of age, I recommend you get the foal training kit. Remember knowledge is power. If you have the right knowledge,
the right information, you can accomplish just about anything. If your horse is two
years of age or older, I recommend and hasn’t been ridden, I recommend that you get
the colt starting kit. Okay, both kits are absolutely
jam-packed with information. The foal training kit has
over 16 hours of footage, high-definition footage of me training several different foals at different ages. It has 14 Arena Mates, the Arena Mate booklets you’re able to take them
with you to the barn, take them with you to the ramp end, so that if there’s a question
or something comes up, instead of having to go back to the house, you can read and look at the photos right there in the Arena Mates. Remember, if you have
the right information, it’s easy to teach your horse the method. The method is the most popular horse training method in the world. The reason is, is because
it’s easy to follow. All you have to do, mate,
is follow the steps. So an important piece of equipment, mate, is what we call our long line. This is an important piece in the foal training exercises, okay. So I’ll use this to teach
the colt to give me two eyes, I’ll teach the foal to
follow me around and lead. It basically is a way to get him used to pressure around his neck
and around his butt, so that he doesn’t overreact to him. If you just put a halter straight on a baby foal and pull on it, usually they’ll rear up in the air, they’ll flip over backwards, they have the potential to hurt themselves or even kill themselves. So the Aussie long line is an extremely important
piece of equipment in the very beginning. So a great exercise I love
to do with my baby foals is what I call turn and go. You can have turn and draw or turn or go. Well, you’re teaching that
foal to follow a field, get him to turn, get him to yield his
hindquarters laterally bent. Remember, the more you can get a baby foal to move laterally around
you, turn left and right, the easy he’ll come off
that halter pressure and walk forward. (upbeat music) The goal, mate, is to get
your horse to turn and draw. So the first part of that is just making sure
your foal is comfortable with that rope swinging around their head. Okay, you need to be able to
flap it up over their ears, over their eyes, and they
don’t overreact to it and get scared of it. I like that, see how I
flopped over her eyes there and she doesn’t throw her header. That’s what we’re looking for. So this is the first part of it, making sure that they’re
comfortable with that rope moving around their head. Now I’m gonna walk up to her, I’m gonna hold on to the snap, below the snap, flip
the rope round her butt, I want to seesaw her back and forth, make sure she is comfortable
with that feeling. Now I’m gonna flap at
the side of ribcage here. She is not jumping or spooking. Now I’m gonna step back,
have her turn, okay, and come up to me, just like that. Good girl. We’ll do it the other way. Okay. I really like it when they
just keep their head still when you flap that rope around, seesaw it to begin with, make sure they’re not worried about that. Flap it against their flank, step back, turn, and then draw her to you. She is a little bit stiff right there, so let me try that again, At time there when I
picked up on that halter, she was just a little
bit kind of lazy there. So let’s try that one again, turn, there, that was better. Good girl. (upbeat music) Okay, here’s a new exercise
I’ll like to teach her. We call it turn and draw, but the first part of turn and draw is where we’re just doing some basic desensitizing up around her head, okay. Lot of horses don’t like having this moved around their head. Okay, so I start this
from a very early age. You’ll find the foals that
have been imprinted like Sarah usually don’t care about things
around their head very much, but the foals that haven’t
been imprinted, they do. Okay, so I like that. See, how she stand there pretty calm. Now if she would throw
her head up right now, I would just keep moving it around, just keep it moving it around until she stood there and relaxed. Okay, I’m gonna flop it over her head. Now what I’m gonna do is
grab up underneath this, snap, okay, with my hand here. In that way it’ll stop her from turning. I’m gonna put this around her butt, just like that, and now I’m just gonna gently
seesaw it back and forth. I’m not gonna pull it real hard. I just wanna get her used to
something behind her butt. Now she is already kind of used to this because she has had the rope behind there, but I’m gonna get the rope and just twill it around beside her belly. A lot of horses get real frightened, something touching their flank or belly. She is doing really good. Now I’m just gonna step back and see if I can get her to
follow the feel of the halter. Her first initial response is probably gonna be to pull against it, so I’m just gonna hold this here. And what I wanted to
do is turn and face me. So this is odd for her because now, (laughs) I swear to god
this thing pulls over the moment she stands up. I need to go over here because there’s no point pulling on her when it’s between the legs like that. I hope you ride better than what you do in your halter training. (laughs) Move over here. Okay, so she initially kind
of forwarded, didn’t she? Okay, (laughs) and she flopped over, but we’ll start that again. You are good on your feet, there is no doubt about you, sir. Regular ballerina. So we’ll try this again. What it does is puts them in
just a little bit of a bind. And it’s her job to follow
the feel of the halter, there we go. Now that wasn’t too bad, was it? You’re a professional flopper, aren’t you? Okay, good girl. So that was really good
what she just did just then. She actually stayed on all four feet, which is just positive, and she turned and faced me. She followed that feel
of that halter, okay. This is why it’s called turn and draw. Eventually it’s gonna
be called turn and go. There we go, good girl. Let’s see what happens if
I stand out here a bit. Ah, good girl. A little resistance, little resistance, let it slide through my hands, slide through my hands,
release that pressure. That’s a girl. So obviously, mate, we had to cut a lot of the foal training kit
out of the television show. We have over 16 hours of footage
in the foal training kit, the television show goes
for less than an hour. So obviously we had to cut a
lot of the information out, but for the first 100 people that purchase the foal training kit, I’m gonna give you an Aussie long line and a foal training halter for your horse worth over $120 combined, but it’s only for the first 100 people. Once those 100 people purchased the kits, the deal is off, so you’ve
got to get in early, mate. (upbeat music) (horse neighs) – [Man] Hey, your horses are thirsty. Sure, I’m full of water, but have you looked inside here? I’m disgusting, I’ve either got a mosquito
swim meet going on or I’m frozen solid. What’s the matter? You think I stink. Wake up and smell the horses here. I’m a big tub of stagnant water, so get your gloves and– – [Man] Dump the tank, install a Classic Equine
by Ritchie waterer. Less work, less waste, less worry. – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. (upbeat music) – Leading beside is a great exercise because it teaches that
foal to come up beside you, it teaches him not to get in front of you when you’re leading and
not to drag behind you. Two of the most annoying
things when you are handling a horse is a horse that’s
always try to run over you and get in front of you, or the opposite is a horse is
always dragging behind you, leaning on the halter,
not wanting to come off. So I want to teach my
foals to be respectful, almost be like my shadow. When I walk, they walk; when I stop, they stop; when I back up, they back up. They’re just very obedient,
they stay right beside me. We want to do it on
both sides of the horse, so they’re equally trained. (upbeat music) The goal, mate of leading beside is to get your foals to lead up beside you and keep your shoulder in the
middle of their neck, okay. So they go the exact same speed I do. Now when I turn left to the inside, she should go a little bit faster and stay up in that position. When I turn my shoulders,
she needs to speed up. Okay, if I turn my shoulders
and go to the right, she should be able to an outside turn. You should be able to drive the front around the rear, like that. Now she is a little lazy
there, so I pointed, and she came up of that rope. Okay, so any time I point
she should come forward. We also wanna be eventually
be able to do it at the trod. Right, lean forward and
she runs beside me, turn. A little bit lazy there, there we go. Come back up again. When I walk, she walks; when I run, she runs. They should rate your body language. She is a little lazy, I’ll point. Always point, then if you
need to use the stick. Make sure you can yield that
forequarters away from you. When you stop, they stop; when you go, they go. They mirror image you. Good girl. (upbeat music) Now, mate, we’re gonna teach
you a leading beside, okay. Now you notice I put the
string around her neck, I wrapped it around her
neck, it’s not tight, but I wrapped it around her neck roughly between halfway down her neck, between her poll and her withers, it’s roughly in the middle here. This is gonna be a reference guide for you to know where you want
to line your shoulder up. So I wanna line my right shoulder up in line with this string. Now there’s gonna be a little bit of give-and-take on that, of
course, because she is little, her neck is not very long, okay, so she is gonna sometimes, she is gonna get it in
front of it and behind it. Okay, but that’s as a general rule what I’m shooting for, okay. Now as far as where you hold
your hand on the lead rope, I always tell people this, put your elbow at the base of the snap and run the rope down your forearm and then grab it, okay. And then you might wanna make
a couple of coils like so. Now that way when you
lean forward and point, see how it puts pressure behind a poll, see how she is not coming off this, that’s what the stick is for. The stick is to encourage
the horse to come forward. So I’m gonna actually
go over to the fence. I used the fence in the beginning to help me teach this, okay. And normally I hold the stick out here, but sometimes it’s a little
hard when they’re smaller, so I might just hold
like this for right now, but I’m gonna point, then tap him. Point, tap him. Point, tap him. Now I’m using the fence to stop her from running away from the stick. A lot of times when you
tap them with the stick, they wanna get a little frightened and they’ll run sideways, away from you. So by using the fence, the fence stops her from running sideways. So I just use it as a barrier. You know she is doing it well, when I point, then she
doesn’t lift the head up. When she lifts her head up, that’s because her feet don’t wanna move. Get those feet moving, there we go, I’m gonna quit on that. So as you can see, leading
beside is very important because a horse that leads
respectfully is obedient. Not only that, it’s actually very safe. I’ve seen many, many people on my career traveling all over the
world for last 28 years get injured leading the horses. Horses are running over the top of you or dragging behind you are
very dangerous and annoying. From that exercise, you
can see we want respect and obedience from a very young age. (upbeat music) Our friends here at Vetericyn have a brand-new equine
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ProtectTheHarvest.com. (upbeat music) – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. (upbeat music) – [Clinton] A very important step in your horse’s young career is teaching them to tie-up, not pull back, not panic, not to break the halter and lead rope, and most importantly not
injure themselves or us. So teaching your baby foal or any horse under two years of age the concept of staying still when tied up, don’t pull the ground, don’t whinny out, don’t pace back and forth, don’t pull back is very, very important. I always use the Aussie Tie Ring when teaching my young horses how to tie, I always use the Tie Ring. It’s kind of like an insurance policy that if something would go wrong or the foal would panic, I’m guaranteed he’s not gonna get hurt. (upbeat music) The goal, mate, is to be able
to desensitize your horse while they’re tied up to
the Aussie Tie Ring, okay. Be able to spank the
ground around your foal and having to stand perfectly relaxed while they’re tied up, okay. I want to be able to
do this on both sides. Ask him to move the hindquarters over, a steady pressure, that’s a girl, then rub her to a stop. When you desensitize
and tied up to a fence, it has a tendency to make them feel more trapped and claustrophobic. So that’s why it’s important to make sure your foal can do this. Remember, the more you try to scare them, the less scared they get. The more you sneak around
them, the spookier they get. Okay, make sure you can
throw this rope at them, and they’re not worried about it, okay. I’ll do it up around their head, I’ll do tons of this around their head until they’re just absolutely bombproof. I’ll wrap ropes around their face. I love that when it just
flops over her face like that, and she just doesn’t care. See that, that’s what we’re looking for, just flop it all over her face and she doesn’t get too
worried about that, okay. See there how she kind of jumped when it went around the nose. So any time she might
flinch or do something, I’ll go back and do it again. Excellent, good girl. (upbeat music) Now, mate, I wanna start introducing Sarah to being tied up, okay. Now I’m not actually gonna
necessarily tie her up and walk away, of course, at her age, but what I do wanna do is get her used to be in up against something that would typically make her feel trapped and claustrophobic which
is a wall or a fence or something like that, okay. Now it’s very, very important that you always use the Aussie Tie Ring when you’re tying up your horses, especially your young horses, okay. So that way if they do pull back, they’re never gonna hurt themselves. So what I’m going to start doing is every time I desensitize, they’re in between each exercise now. Now to use this, you just
fold the lead rope in half, poke it through the hole and then the tongue comes up like that. That way if Sarah would
happen to pull back or panic, see how she can slide the
rope through the ring, but I’m gonna tie her up to this, okay, with the Tie Ring on the easiest setting. And then I’m just gonna do just some basic little
desensitizing things, just like she already knows. Flog her with kindness,
okay, throw the rope at her. Just get her comfortable standing still while being tied up to the fence, okay. Now I’m not worried about her
pulling back or getting hurt because she is not tied hard and fast. Yield the hindquarters, there we go. See, like right there,
see what just happened. She kind of half pulled
back then just a little bit and she pulled two or three
inches of rope through there and then she quit panicking, okay. So every time I desensitize
her from now on, I’m gonna come back and
do this type of stuff, spank the ground. Okay, I like to do lots of
moving her butt back and forth with a little bit of driving
pressure and steady pressure. See here, see this here, perfect example why you use this. Look what happened. She kind of pulled back
and panicked a little bit, she pulled some slack through the rope and then she immediately what, came forward two or three
steps and stopped panicking. That was a perfect example
of why you use the Tie Ring because I guarantee that if she was tied up to
something solid just then, she would have pulled back
and maybe flipped over and broke her neck or
done something bad, okay. That was a great example there. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. (upbeat music) – The thing I love most about my job is, is being able to build products new products that are
gonna make a difference. I’m constantly bringing products home, using them and seeing how they
perform on different horses. I wanna be able to build things that actually perform and
enhance a horse owner’s life. I truly, truly love what I do. (upbeat music) – [Clinton] Another really important part of your horse’s career
is handling his feet. I can’t tell you how many
farriers have walked up to me and said, Clinton, the people
that follow your method, their horses are easy to trim, their horses are easy to shoe them. People that don’t follow your method have horses who wanna kick out, they have horses that
wanna run the circle, they basically make farriers
double the work for them, okay. Getting your horse’s feet handled from a young age is very important. Not only from a trimming perspective to make sure their legs are
growing straight and strong, but also from just a safety perspective. It’s not fun for you or
your farrier to get kicked, get run over, get struck, and it also teaches
your horses bad habits, if he learns to these
habits early on in his life. So getting to your horse’s
legs from an early age, teaching him to standstill
calmly and respectfully while the farrier works on his
feet is an important lesson and you don’t wanna underestimate him. (upbeat music) Okay, let’s work with the
legs for the first time as far as actually trying to pick him up. I don’t recommend you
do a lot with their legs until this stage. When I say a lot with their
legs, let me reword that. Trying to pick him up, do a lot of handling of their legs and rubbing their legs
and touching their legs, do tons of that, but as far
as trying to restrict it and pick it up, no, don’t do a lot of that until roughly they’re
about the stage that she is because you’re only gonna
run into trouble, okay. Again, if she acts jumpy, come
back and get rid of it, okay. (mumbles) little deal is make
sure you can put your rope around their legs and
seesaw it up and down, make sure they’re comfortable with something touching them here. She’s had us do a lot
of rubbing of her leg, so she doesn’t have a lot of fear associated with us touching her. Now we’ve never actually
picked her feet up before, but she is good with us rubbing. Okay, I’ll do the same thing, (mumbles) have to throw a flex in there every once in awhile. Do the same thing with their backend. I’m just looking for those, on those spots, twill it around. There, she started licking her lips, reach up and rub her and retreat. I can pull it up and then release it. Pull it up and then release it. Pull it up and then release it. Pull it up and then release it. Okay, right, now typically
with the adult horses when we pick up their
front feet we go ahead and squeeze that hard lump of skin on the inside of their knee there that some people call it a
chestnut or an ergot, okay. And as soon as they take
their weight off that leg, they release it, okay,
they stop pinching it, and that’s the reward. And that’s the first step is skew them to pick up their own foot. And then from there you start holding it up longer and longer. Okay, now with the back
leg with an adult horse, I go ahead and squeeze
the cap on their hock and I squeeze that, and as soon as they take
their foot off the ground, I release it and rub them and retreat and do it over and over again. That’s the key to picking
their back leg up. However, with the foals
I don’t do it that way, exactly that way because I
find that littler they are, it’s not so much as they get older, but the littler they are, when you start squeezing
them and pinching them, they seem to get confused
and they wanna walk around. They don’t seem to understand that it means pick up that one leg. What they do is they
wanna walk in a circle. So when they’re little like
this, they’re nowhere as big. the reason why we don’t do it, the reason why with the adult horses we want them to pick their foot up to us because they’re way too
much, they’re too heavy, you can’t physically
pull it off the ground. When they’re this age you can, they’re not that hard, okay. So that’s the main difference. So with her, I’m just gonna
go ahead and grab a foot and then release it, just like that. Now you noticed I picked it up and then immediately dropped it. Most people wanna pick
it up and hang on to it or move it or start to trim it. I’m gonna pick it up and hold it just a little bit longer each time. Okay, so right now I’m
just gonna pick it up, and by the time she
thinks about running away or doing something silly
I’m gonna retreat it. I’ll pick it up and then retreat it. Once you get your horses
legs to be handled where he is not fearful, he is respectful, he’ll stand there and let you trim him, we basically trim our baby foals about every five to six weeks because when they’re little like that, their feet grow very, very quickly, their hooves grow quickly. So we trim them every five to six weeks basically for the first two
years of their life, okay. The early you get to
your foals, the better. If you can’t remember everything we covered in this television show, plus obviously there’s a lot that’s not in here from the kit, the foal training kit is 16
hours of high-definition DVDs, over 14 Arena Mates as well. For the first 100 people that
buy the foal training kit, I’m gonna give them one
of our Aussie long lines and also a foal training
halted for their horse worth over $120 combined, but it’s only for the first 100 people. After that the deal is off. So it’s very important, if you have a young horse
under two years of age, get in now, get your free long line, get your free halter with your kit and start getting the
method on your young horses. (upbeat music) Don’t forget to check out
our next training session with Titan and the method. (upbeat music) – [Man] Love for a treasured dam or sire, conservation of your favorite bloodline, the dream of a big payoff. No matter what your
reasons for raising a foal, the reward will only be complete if he becomes the horse you wanting to be. In the first installment of this new professional series collection,
the foal training series, Clinton Anderson
demonstrates how his method can ensure your dreams
for your foal come true. The foal training series
follows two foals, one imprinted at birth
and one left untouched through their first exposure
to haltering, leading, handling feet, tying and more. The Clinton Anderson foal training series gives you step-by-step instructions and exercises on DVDs and Arena Mates, all beautifully packaged
for your enjoyment. Get the Clint Anderson
foal training series to instill a solid
foundation of respect, trust and willingness in your foal, and ensure all your dreams
for him do come true. – [Man] For 128 years
ADM Alliance Nutrition has been doing what’s right for the horse. It was ADM who cut back
on starch and sugar, ADM who balanced vitamins and minerals, and ADM who put forage
first in horse nutrition. Today you can still trust ADM for the information and products you need. Learn more about equine nutrition and ADM’s premium
products at grostrong.com. That’s G-R-O Strong.com,
ADM Alliance Nutrition. Doing what’s right for the horse. (upbeat music) – [Man] Hey, mate, if
you’re looking for a fun and inspiring way to
challenge your horsemanship, then join me for a three-day
horsemanship clinic, so I can help you become
a better horseman. At each clinic I work
with only 20 participants, teaching them the fundamentals groundwork and riding exercises. My clinicians would join me to ensure everybody makes progress
and receive one-on-one help. Spectators are welcome to watch all three days of the clinic. We’ll also have our retail store setup with all of my products and kits. So, mate, if you wanna learn
the method from me personally, sign-up to participate or get
your spectator tickets now and I’ll see you on the road, mate. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) – When I first moved
from Ohio down to Texas almost 10 years ago, I had
to find a new vet down here. So I traveled around to different vets and I found a vet that I wanted to use. And within about a month
of me being here in Texas, I had a baby foal that
got a cut on his butt, and it wasn’t real bad, but it did need three or four stitches to make sure it healed up really well. So after my foals have been born for about four or five weeks, they know all of the
fundamental level of the method other than the round penning, of course, but they do all the exercises
on the foal training kit. So when I take a mare and foal somewhere, I put a halter on the mare,
I put a halter on the foal, two people, one person leads the mare and one person leads the
foal and we go somewhere. Well, me and my ranch manager at the time, we packed the mare and foal up and took him to the local vet, and the vet, we got out of the trailer, I had a hold of the foal, my ranch manager had a hold of the mare, and the vet came over and said, listen, I’m running 10 minutes late, I’ll be with you in just a second. I said, no problem, we
just stayed right there. And I noticed that every few minutes that vet would keep looking
back at me and the foal and then he’d go back
to what he was doing, he looked back over, and I thought that was kind of odd, why he kept looking
back over at this foal? Well, finally after 10 minutes
the vet came over and said, okay, what can I help you with? And I just said, well,
he’s got a cut on his butt, needs a few stitches, blah, blah, blah. And the vet looked at me and he said, how old is this foal? And I said, he’s about four weeks old, a little bit over four
and a half weeks of age. And he said, I can’t believe
he’s standing here so calmly with all this commotion at the vet clinic, horses everywhere, he’s standing here like a 10-year-old little gelding. He’s not making any noise, he’s not whining it out, he’s not moving around, he’s absolutely, he’s
standing there like a statue. I can’t believe how well behaved he is. And I looked at the vet
honestly and I said this, I said, well, he doesn’t
know any other way to act. From the time he’s opened his little eyes, I told him two things,
don’t be frightened of me, but respect me, don’t be
frightened, but respect me. See, he thought this was
really, really good behavior because all the other young horses that come through the vet
clinic are half crazy. I didn’t think what that foal was doing was exceptionally good,
that was what was expected. I expect all my young horses to act quiet, respectful, obedient. That’s not good behavior,
that’s expected behavior, and you should expect it as well. So it’s fun to work with
obstacles with your horses, especially when they get
to that yielding age. They’re kind of rambunctious, they’re looking for fun things to do. You can get a lot of the small obstacles, lots on the ground, water
traps, little jumps, small jumps, nothing real big and high. And get your horse to pay attention to where his feet are going. You can have your horse
go through mud puddles, go through gullies, et cetera. So small obstacle courses can be a hell of a lot of fun for yieldings, it gives them something fun to do, it’s interesting and it shows them where to place their feet, and it gives them a purpose to
do in the groundwork as well. (upbeat music) Okay, I love to give my
horses a purpose or a job to what they do, okay. So the obstacle course
that I’ve got out here is a great way to do that, okay. So I’m just gonna start
out with a few little logs and things that she has to walk over. Now initially she might jump them or try to hurry over them, but eventually I just want
them to take their time and just kind of walk over them. So we’re doing, basically
you’re gonna see me do all the same exercise that
we did in the DVD series, except now I’m going to
do it with an obstacle where she has something to
kinda focus on or a purpose. A purpose is, pick up your feet, look where you’re going,
I like that there. I like this direction where
she is just a little bit calmer and she’s just kinda taking her time and walking over them. I really like this little
trench we have here because a lot of horses feel
trapped and claustrophobic going through something
that’s narrow like this. So before I get him going through it, I make sure they can jump over it. There we go, good girl. See how she kinda slipped just then, she is gonna take care of her feet. She is gonna learn how
to judge some distances. And send him around where
it’s not quite as high. Yield, I like it how I can just kinda look at the hindquarters now and she gives me two eyes. Now let’s bring her down through it. There, yield. I love it how I can keep my feet still and get her to go back and forth. Just off that suggestion, see how little I’m using the stick now. This all comes from that
foundation we put on last year. This is a great little obstacle, this is what we call our
teeter-totter bridge. This is a great way to introduce
them to trailer loading as far as get them to used
to walking on something that moves and makes a noise. So I always start out just
kind of sending them across it. She is pretty good with that. Anytime she wants to
stop and investigate it or wait there, you let them. Good girl, (mumbles) I like this because it
moves under their feet. Good girl. A lot of horses panic when
things move underneath them. Now that was really good. When I dropped down, she
just kinda waited there, do a little desensitizing with her. Good girl. Well, mate, I hope you’ve
enjoyed today television show. Remember, working with
baby foals or weanlings can be extremely rewarding process. They learn so quickly, it’s just great to see
them progress every day and they’re training with the method. Now remember, knowledge is power. So one last time the first 100 people that purchase the foal training kit would get our long line and our halter worth over $120 of foal
halter for your horse, and the Aussie long line. So both of these pieces
of equipment are crucial to having success with the method, but it’s only for the first 100 people. Don’t miss out, mate. (upbeat music)

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