Pegasus:  The Winged Horse of Greek Mythology – Mythological Bestiary #01 – See U in History
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Pegasus: The Winged Horse of Greek Mythology – Mythological Bestiary #01 – See U in History

August 31, 2019


Pegasus is certainly one of the most renowned and admired mythological creatures. His myth is sourced in the Greek mythology. Pegasus is an equine with wings and a
pure heart. The winged steed is the son of Medusa and Poseidon. He was born after the death of the
Gorgon Medusa, who was beheaded by the hero Perseus. Pegasus was born from the blood spilt by Medusa’s neck, and so did his brother, the golden giant Chrysaor. Medusa was pregnant from Poseidon, but the curse that turned her into a Gorgon prevented her from seeing the light. Pegasus only came to this world after her death. The winged horse flew to Mount Helicon, the place where his inspiring muses lived. There he hits the ground with his hooves as much as he could and materializes the
spring Hippocrene. The one who drank water from it would be inspired by the muses to
carry out the most beautiful artistic feats Coining the term Source of Inspiration. Due to his fame, many were those who tried to tame him, without success. But, with the help of the Goddess Athena, the Hero Bellerophon his able
to tame Pegasus . with a golden lace offered by the goddess Riding the winged horse, the Hero manages to defeat the dreaded Chimera. The monster who was ravaging the kingdom of Lycia. At last, after the fall of Bellerophon who tried to use Pegasus to reach the Olympus. Bellerophon who tried to use Pegasus to reach the Olympus Zeus decides to pay tribute to the formidable creature by turning it into the constellation of Pegasus. The magnificent animal started to be seen as a symbol of creativity, poetic inspiration and impetuosity.

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  1. "the magnificent animal started to be seen as a symbol of creativity, poetic inspiration, and impetuosity"

    and then, 2000+ years later, fluttershy and rainbow dash?

    This series has, on many occasions, made me wonder what the original writers would have thought of the modern incarnations of their creations.

  2. Hmm… I hope there will be a story, or more of an explanation of how Pegasus went from Perseus, slayer of Medusa, (Pegasus' mother) to its new master Bellerophon. And since Medusa is the mother, how is Pegasus allowed Perseus to ride him knowing he killed his mother?
    Edit: Sorry. If Medusa wasn't killed, Pegasus and his sibling(??) wouldn't have been born.

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