The Wild Horses (OLD VERSION) – Hoffman Academy
Articles Blog

The Wild Horses (OLD VERSION) – Hoffman Academy

November 17, 2019


♫ Hello and welcome back. I’m Joseph
Hoffman. Today we are learning how to play a folk
song called “The Wild Horses.” First I’ll play and sing it for you, then,
yeah, you guessed it, we’re going to learn it. ♫ ♫ This is the dance of the wild and running horses ♫ ♫ This is the dance of the wild and running horses ♫ ♫ Stamp on the ground now, tramp on the ground now ♫ ♫ This is the dance of the wild and running horses ♫ To get started learning “The Wild Horses,”
we’re going to learn a new pentascale called D minor. Let’s come to the piano to find this new
pentascale. Here we’re looking at our old friend the D major pentascale. If i want
to turn a major pentascale into a minor pentascale here’s what to do. You just find the third note, DO, RE, MI, here it is, and lower it to the nearest
possible note to the left. Another way to say this is that we
lowered this note one half step, so now instead of an F-sharp we have an F
natural. A natural just means the regular white key. So here we have the D minor pentascale.
It’s all white keys, or we could say all naturals. The reason we use minor instead of major
is for its special sound. Minor to me can sound very sad and lonely, like in “Silver
Birch Tree,” a song we’re going to learn pretty soon. Hear that kind of sad and lonely sound?
But minor can also sound wild and exciting like in “The Wild Horses.” Let’s try playing the D minor pentascale.
Can you cover up the white keys starting on D with finger 1, E, F, G, A, cover these
up and let’s try to play and name the keys. Go. D E F G A. Good, now, let’s step
down starting on A. Go. A G F E D. Now let’s come to the staff and learn
the melody of “The Wild Horses.” Here on the treble staff we have the five notes
of the C major pentascale, C D E F G, but today we’re going to need the five
notes of the D minor pentascale like this. Can you point and say the letter names
with me? D E F G. Then what’s this one? That’s right, a step
above G is A. These are the five notes we’ll need for “The Wild Horses,” but at the
first the melody begins on a D and then it skips up to F. ♫ D F G A ♫
These four notes make ♫ This is the dance ♫ Ok, let’s try those four notes with our
fingers. So, DO will be on D this time, so our finger one will play D and then
we’ll skip up step up step up ♫ This is the dance ♫ Now you try. Great, now let’s go back to
the staff to learn the rest of the phrase. Now the next three notes are a repeating
note, ♫ of the wild ♫ So what are the letter names for these
three notes? That’s right, there are three more A’s.
♫ of the wild ♫ and then after that the notes step down, ♫ and running ♫ then it ends with 2 D’s. ♫ horses ♫
Two repeating D’s. Now let’s say the whole melody for this
first phrase using steps, skips, and repeats like this. I’ll do it once. Start, skip up, step up,
step up, repeat, repeat, repeat, step down, step down, step down, step down, repeat. Now you try. Can you say it
yourself while we point? Ready, go. Start, skip up, now you’re on
your own. Great job. Now let’s try to say the
letter names. My turn first. D E F G A A A A G F E D D. Now your turn. Point and say the letter names. Go. Great job. Now let’s try the entire first phrase of
“The Wild Horses.” You remember we start off,
♫ This is the dance ♫ Your turn. Once we make it up to finger five then
we repeat A three more times.
♫ A A A ♫ Your turn. Good, and then at that point
the notes step down. ♫ wild and running horses ♫ Your turn. Good, now let’s try the entire
first phrase together at the same time while we sing the words. Ready, go. ♫ This is the dance of the wild
and running horses ♫ Great job. Now let’s try it on the piano
keys. Ok, let’s place our right hand back in the D minor pentascale. I’ll play a
part of the melody and then you play it back. We start with ♫ D F G A ♫
Your turn. Good, then three repeated A’s after that.
♫ A A A ♫ your turn. I’d like to remind you that when you’re
playing your pinky, your finger five, play near the tip. We have these three repeated A’s which
should look like this, not like this, ♫ A A A ♫ After the repeated A’s, then we stepped
down, ♫ A G F E D D ♫ Your turn. Good. If we put all those pieces together
it will sound like this. ♫ This is the dance of the wild and running horses ♫ Now press pause and I’d like you
to play that phrase five times by yourself. When you can do that
confidently press play to go on. Now let’s take a look at the score for “The Wild Horses.” A score is
music written out, usually on paper or in a book, with notes and rhythms on the
staff. Here’s the score for “The Wild Horses.” Can you tell me what you notice or
recognize? First thing you probably noticed was this cool illustration of
these wild horses. This was actually drawn by my sister,
Rachel Hoffman Bayless, who is a great illustrator. Let’s take a closer look at these first
two lines to look at some of the musical symbols. Let’s hunt for things that we recognize
on these two lines. Can you say some things you recognize?
You probably saw this treble clef here, also you probably noticed some TA’s and
TI-TI’s, or quarter notes and eighth notes. Let’s try saying the rhythm of this
first line using rhythm words. Ready? Say TA for quarter notes or TI-TI for the
eighth notes. Try it along with me. Go. TA TI-TI TA TI-TI TI-TI TI-TI TA TA. Great, now looking down here at
line two, can you tell me if these notes are the
same or different compared to line one. If you said, the same, you’re correct. If we looked at every single note, they all
match exactly the same, so we could say that this first line we’ll call A, and we’ll
also call the second line A because it’s a perfect match. Now let’s look at line three of “The Wild
Horses.” Can you tell me if these notes are the
same or different from our A line. If you said different, you’re correct. So we’re going to call this line the B
section of our song. I’ll put a capital B over here. Now let’s
figure out how these notes move. Can you tell me if they’re stepping,
skipping, or repeating. We’ll say start for the first note, then what do you see here? That’s right, it’s a repeat. And then from here to here is it a step
up or a skip up? If you said skip up, you’re correct. See, there’s this line that
passes through, and so we skipped over this line and went from a space to a
space, so we skip up. Then what? That’s right, it’s a step down,
step down. Let’s try the whole thing together now.
We’ll say start, repeat, skip up, step down, step down. Let’s keep going now. Repeat, repeat, skip up, step down, step down. Ok now let’s try to say the rhythm words
while we point. We’ll say TA for quarter notes and TI-TI for eighth notes. Ready, try with me, go. TA TI-TI TA TA, TA TI-TI TA TA. Great job. Let’s practice moving our
fingers for the B section now. We have D, repeat, and then skip up. Now your turn. Good, and that makes ♫ stamp on the ♫ so on the word “the” is where the skip happens. Then after that it steps down, steps down, so
we have ♫ stamp on the ground now ♫ Your turn. Good, and then “tramp on the ground now” is the same thing. We have D D F E D. Your turn. Good, now let’s try both patterns together, stamp on the ground now, tramp on the ground now, with fingers, ready, go. ♫ stamp on the ground now ♫ ♫ tramp on the ground now ♫ Great job, let’s try it on the piano keys.
Once again, come to the D minor pentascale. My turn first. We have D D F. Your turn. Good, now make that a little longer. This
time after we go D D F then we’ll step down, step down, like this. ♫ D D F E D ♫ Your turn. Good, and then we repeat that
same pattern again. ♫ D D F E D ♫ Good, now let’s try it with the lyrics
the lyrics go, ♫ stamp on the ground ♫ ♫ now, tramp on the ground now ♫ Now remember it’s on the word the that
you skip up. Go ahead and press pause and try that
phrase five times. Press play when you’re ready to go on.
Now let’s check the very last line. Here’s line four of
“The Wild Horses.” Would you call this an A or a B? That’s right, these notes match
line a, so I’m going to draw a capital A here. So now we can see that the form of “The
Wild Horses” is actually A A B A. We call that the form of the piece, like a map to
tell us what to play when. I’m going to show you what it will sound like to put
all four of those lines together, starting with the first A, here we go. Now line two. Now the B section. Last line. Now it’s your turn. Press pause and see
if you can put all four lines together. Press play when you’re ready to go on. Nice work learning “The Wild Horses” today.
For your practice this week I’d like you to try playing “Wild Horses”
in both your right hand and left hand. For an extra challenge, try with both hands at the same time, or
with your eyes closed, but above all have fun when you practice. Enjoy watching
your skills grow and be proud of what you accomplish. Thanks for watching and
I’ll see you next time. ♫ I do indeed like the notes of the D
minor pentascale. It’s made of such healthy ingredients. What do you mean healthy?
Why, the notes are all natural! Good one.

Only registered users can comment.

  1. I'm still struggling SO HARD from Dinah… It's so hard for my BRAIN to process the fact that I have to play two chords (like the V7 CHORD) in just a couple of seconds while playing an entirely different set of notes ALL RIGHT ON TIME…

  2. I kind of like it because it is very adventuress and sad at the same time‼️‼️‼️❗️❗️❗️💠💠🦂🍙 😎😕😏😀😇😇🙃😠🍜🍲🍜🍲🐲😀

  3. Hey Mr. Hoffman. I love your lessons and you are the only teacher I am following now.. wante to ask when do we start leaning the chord approach and chord progression in piano?

  4. Your hand-writing in block letters looks a lot like mine. Haha.

    Trying this with my eyes closed felt weird and fun. I wonder how doable it might be when we get to more complicated songs. It should be interesting!
    I imagine there must be some Piano Daredevils out there.

  5. On that note, the Daredevil theme would be a really cool song to learn sometime.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFYFh8w4758

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *