Treating a Horse with Heaves | The Incredible Dr. Pol
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Treating a Horse with Heaves | The Incredible Dr. Pol

September 4, 2019


NARRATOR: Doctor pulls
off to another farm call. Today, his patient
is 22-year-old Julep. Morning. Good morning. Judy called for Julep
because Julep was down and he thought it had colic. She is a little special to us. Felt her feet. They’re cool. They’re not hot. Good. Oh, that doesn’t
look too bad now. – [inaudible]
– OK. Hang on. Let me just check her over
because she’s breathing bad. Oh. Does she have
heaves a little bit? She’s got asthma or something. Yeah, right. Heaves. NARRATOR: Heaves is a
chronic lung disease similar to asthma in humans. Whoa, whoa, whoa. A little fast heartbeat. Yeah. Gut sounds. Yesterday was one
of those crazy days– hot, a little humid– almost rain. So that is hard on these
horses that have heaves– very hard. Yeah. She’s breathing. See that? Yeah. That’s the problem. These horses don’t
have much chance of really getting enough air
and I think this is the problem. Let me see how she’s walking. Yeah, flared nostrils
and everything. It was really hot here. You couldn’t hardly
breathe or whatever. And she spent just about
all day inside that lean-to in the shade. OK. Hang on. I’m going to treat her. We’ll fix her up one
way or the other. NARRATOR: Dr. Pol
gives Julep a steroid to reduce the inflammation
in her airways, enabling her to breathe easier. Oh, yes. That feels better, doesn’t it? Oh, she’s eating. Yeah. So when Julep started eating,
that always is a good sign. And so I hope that you know
she will turn out and be fine. I think she got
dehydrated yesterday. So the main thing
is now fresh grass with lots of moisture, water,
and a little tender love and care. Make sure that you walk her and
that she gets a bowel movement. OK. That’s good.
– Thank you so much. We can all breathe easy again. Yeah. Except her. Prognosis is always guarded. You know they don’t
get over the heaves. It’s an allergy,
just like in people. But the main thing is just
to keep them comfortable and get them you
know treated whenever they can’t get enough air. OK. Thank you. Yeah, we’ll see you. I feel a lot better inside and
emotionally because he’s done everything he can do for
that animal at this time, and that’s why Dr. Pol has
been my vet for over 25 years. Bye bye. Thank you.

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  1. Why doesn't this "vet" address the fact she's horribly underweight. He probably administered a steroid so she'll be fine for a short while but unless she gets some weight on her and a continued approach to address her heaves she'll not survive a month. She'll get too weak to get up once she's down.

  2. She might just be old and a tall thin breed, but you're supposed to feel the ribs when you touch the stomache area, not see them. "If you can hang o coat on their hips, there needs to be more food at their lips" Is something I've heard a few times

  3. Why is everyone complaining? Did you p not watch the dam thing? They said the horse had hard time breathing and the airway is swollen sooooo the animal doesnt wanna eat. Like calm the fk down. Once the horse start feeling better I am sure its gonna start eating

  4. Why is she so thin? I have seen plenty of horses with heaves at a decent weight. Plenty of horses older than her at a decent weight. No one should wait until a horse is in that condition before calling a vet.

  5. As some one who owns a horse with heaves I can say, in the hotter months horses with the condition WILL loose a lot of weight. Yes it's very distressing to see a horse so underweight but the owners other horses were in good condition and after the steroid injection they were shocked and pleased to see her eating grass, which I imagine she didn't feel like doing before it she couldn't catch her breath.

  6. Are you sure to let the horse to the owner? I mean, look at how thin and skinny the mare is!
    They never feed her or what?!

  7. For all of you wondering about the horseโ€™s weight- the horse was obviously old and sick. ALL old horses, especially those with heaves, loose weight and look bony. Their back also begins to sag. This is very common in horses as they age.
    We have multiple horses that are 20+ years old, and this is something that naturally happens to many of them.
    PLEASE donโ€™t be the online vet here. People who actually own and care for horses know this. If Dr. Pol thought the horse was being abused, he would have said so.
    Thank you.

  8. For all of you wondering about the horseโ€™s weight- the horse was obviously old and sick. ALL old horses, especially those with heaves, loose weight and look bony. Their back also begins to sag. This is very common in horses as they age.
    We have multiple horses that are 20+ years old, and this is something that naturally happens to many of them.
    PLEASE donโ€™t be the online vet here. People who actually own and care for horses know this. If Dr. Pol thought the horse was being abused, he would have said so.
    Thank you.

  9. Seeing a horses ribs does NOT immediately indicate that it is underweight. This is obviously a senior mare (she is, it literally says she is 22 in the description), seniors lose volume around bony areas (hollows of the eyes, flank, ribs, hips, along the spine, croup, etc). You can tell that she is not underweight by the fullness of her barrel. It's like the people who immediately jump oh racehorses and complain that they think they're underweight, you just don't have experience with race fit horses. Which is why it's important to have the facts before you complain. It's honestly embarrassing to see people try to play vet online. As an equine nutritionist, I'm actually curious what they're feeding her because she looks really well kept for an elder-mare.

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