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World Championships Road Race Course Preview 2019 | Yorkshire Men’s & Women’s Route Recce

October 12, 2019


– The UCI World Road Cycling Championships are coming here to Yorkshire
on September the 21st. Now as a proud Yorkshire-man, I’m extremely excited about this. It’s gonna be mint. So, I’m going to take you
through all the courses, the races, what you can
expect, the key locations, and we’re gonna get some insight from one of the greatest
Yorkshire cyclists of all time. We’re also gonna to do the GCN presenter predictions slash kisses of death. But before we do any of
that, make sure you subscribe and click the little bell icon. This will give you notifications and also help support the channel. Right-O, let’s have a
gander at the races, then. That’s Yorkshire for look. (upbeat music) – The World’s in Yorkshire
is gonna be mint. Not only is it a beautiful place, every time a high profile
bike race has come here, the crowds have been phenomenal. Yorkshire’s really taken to
cycling and it’s great to see. Now, for the World’s, the stakes are high. Win and you receive the
coveted rainbow jersey, which you then get to wear
for the whole calendar year. Now, it’s a prize that’s very prestigious. But in Yorkshire, it’s, well,
it’s not quite as prestigious as winning the County
Cricket Championship, but prestigious nonetheless. (piano music) – The World Championships
is actually several races taking place over the course of a week. But all the races finish here
along this stretch of road in the beautiful spa town of Harrogate. It’s spelt Harrogate, but
it’s pronounced Harrogate. And this actually was also the site of the finish of stage one
of the 2014 Tour de France. The stage won by Marcel Kittel. And you may remember that Mark
Cavendish sadly crashed out, actually just there, by Betty’s Tea Rooms. The biggest events are the
men’s and women’s elite races on the 28th and 29th of September. In addition to this,
there are also the junior and under 23 races, the para-cycling race, and the timed trials. The organisers have done a
great job with the Worlds, as the races are starting
in different locations but all finishing here in Harrogate. Many of them on a 14 kilometre finishing circuit in the town. This is brilliant as it brings the event and spectacle to a wider audience. Full details of the routes,
including the timings can be found on the official website. The link is in the description below. The women’s race is 150 kilometres long. Starts in Bradford and goes
over the categorised climb of the Cote de Lofthouse and then finishes with three laps of the Harrogate circuit. The men’s race, the day after, is 284 kilometres long. This includes the categorised
climbs of the Cote de Cray. Buttertubs Pass, and
Grinton Moor, before hitting Harrogate for seven laps of
the 14 kilometre circuit. (dramatic music) To get some expert insight into the men’s and women’s elite races, I’m gonna chat to one of the
greatest Yorkshire cyclists of all time. Malcolm Elliot is a rider that needs little
introduction to many of you but in case you’re unfamiliar he’s a rider known for
his sprinting prowess as a multiple national Champion, and also winner of the
points classification at the Vuelta Espagna. He’s also raced on, and won, many times on these roads, in this demanding terrain, making him an ideal chap to talk to. Good to see you Malcolm. – And you, Ollie. – Yep, thanks for joining us. So, we’re on the, we’re in Harrogate now, we’re on the 14 kilometre
finishing circuit. This is actually the finishing
straight here, isn’t it? – Yeah, takes us back to
Yorkshire 2014 isn’t it? – [Ollie] Yeah, yeah. – [Malcolm] And the first days there. – Yeah, and it’s, well, this
street is actually one way so we can’t actually drive
this part of the circuit, but we’re gonna jump in the car and have a look at the rest. So, should we go? – Let’s do it. – Nice. (upbeat music) So this is the final corner
onto the finishing straight. What would you make of this then, Malcolm? – Well, it’s tight, it’s very tight, it’s pretty much impossible to get around without removing
somewhat, some, if not all of the existing furniture here. I think, for a World Championships, it’s quite probable that will happen. They look relatively temporary. That gonna enable a
slightly faster approach into this final turn up the climb here, which is, it’s an appreciable climb ’cause you’re not gonna be carrying that much speed into it anyway and given the distance and the difficulty of the finishing circuit, it’s gonna be really really selective. – So we’ve had a look at
the finishing circuit. Behind us is the road that
is the finishing straight. The actual finish is just
by some traffic lights, just over there. Now, just to give you a quick recap, the men’s race is 284 kilometres, 185 are tackled before they
reach the finishing circuit. And there’s over 4,200 metres
of climbing, which is massive. The women’s race is shorter, that’s 150 kilometres, with around 2,600 metres
of climbing in total. So, based upon what you’ve seen and the finishing circuit, Malcolm, how do you think the
racing’s gonna play out for both, well firstly the men and then the women’s
races on these circuits? – I think, obviously depends largely how they decide they want to race it. I think inevitably you’re
gonna get that early breakaway or somebody going out there
for, to chance their arm at the early move, but it
rarely ever, never works. So, it’s gonna be, there’s
effectively two races in one as we said, 185 kilometres
out there in the dells which would be a demanding enough race, in and of itself. Then we’re tacking on another
100 K kermesse course, but with climbs and descents and hairpins and narrow bridges. – Very technical, as well. – Yeah, very technical, and as I’ve said, narrow, a lot of turns, going to get back into the,
into the residential streets of Harrogate. A lot of lefts and rights, and then again, descents, slow turns, climbs out. Great for spectators, but
not so easy for, to, well to race around, obviously. But, it’s gonna be a little bit easier, rather more difficult, for a team to get organised to be
able to pull a chase down the, pull a breakaway
back if they need to. – Based upon the sort
of circuit you’ve seen, what kind of rider do you
think this is gonna best suit? ‘Cause, if we think back to the 2014 tour, for the men’s course,
that was the first 185 K of this course, it’s the same pretty much. And the sprinters all
made through the finish. So you know, Cav and Kittel. – Sure, yeah, sure there
wasn’t a rainbow jersey at stake that day, which
I think’s gonna alter it, and it was the first day of three week, the three week grand tour. So, it might’ve been a
little bit more controlled. I mean, it was still a fantastic day out, but yeah that sprinters
effectively all got there. I think this World
Championship’s gonna be, gonna be quite different, given the fact that
there’s a rainbow jersey and we’ve got the, it’s
gonna get raced differently than the first ever grand tour. And then you final 100 K’s of hard going, constant
hard going around here, a lot of concentration required for what’s gonna be a seven hour race. – Fantastic, right thanks for your, thanks for your time Malcolm. It’s been a pleasure talking to you. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, good to see you. (upbeat music) – Riding in Yorkshire is hard. Now, course profiles may look flat when compared to a mountainous queen stage of the Tour de France. But anyone that’s ridden
here, including professionals, will tell you that the reality
is that they’re anything but. The road’s characteristically feature relentless undulations, often with short, sharp,
nasty, steep gradients. And then that is combined with lots of technical
turns and road surfaces which are often very rough and grippy and this results in long,
energy sapping, brutal days in the saddle. And that’s before you
even factor in the weather which, to put it nicely,
is, well, often inclement. (upbeat music) – So, with all that considered, who do we think are the main contenders? Well, if we look back
to the 2014 Tour stage, on that day, most of the big sprinters made it to the finish. And this suggests, that
they could do here as well, opening up the race to the likes of: Caleb Ewan, Alexander
Kristoff and Peter Sagan. However, owing to his,
well, amazing performances and form this year, and the punchy nature of the course, Julian Alaphilippe is also one to watch. And with breakthrough performances in this year’s classic season, Mathieu van der Poel, the
astonishing young talent is also a surefire contender. And after his recent, stunning win in Clasica San Sebastian, many will also be
watching Remco Evenepoel. There’s a lot of people
who could win this race, which makes it very exciting. In the women’s race, all hoards of fans are gonna be cheering for local girl, Yorkshire lass, Lizzie Deignan. The race even passes through
her hometown in Otley. But as a former World Champion, if she’s gonna be successful again, she’s gonna have to overcome
the super strong Dutch squad, which contains Annemiek can Vleuten, Anna van der Breggen, Chantal Blaak, and a resurgent Marianne Vos, all of whom could potentially
win the race themselves. It’s gonna be close, it’s gonna be tough, it’s gonna be awesome. Now, with all that considered, it’s time for the GCN
presenter predictions slash kisses of death. So, I’m gonna go first,
and in the men’s race I’m gonna say Mathieu van der Poel and in the women’s race, I’m
rooting for the local girl, Lizzie Deignan. (beep) – Well, actually Ollie, we’ve had a meeting here at GCN, amongst the presenters, without you, behind your back, and we decided we’re not
going to make predictions six weeks before the actual event, rather, we’re going to wait
for the big GCN preview of all the contenders, one week
before the event takes place so that we know how their form is, and whether they’re actually
riding in the first place. Anyway, back to you, is there
something that you can tell us that is actually going to stay the same? – So, where to watch the race? Well, the big climbs along the routes are always gonna make great spots. So, Buttertubs Pass in the men’s race, that was incredible
during the Tour de France, and you can expect the same again. And the same can be said, for Lofthouse in the women’s race. But for me, I think the finishing circuit in Harrogate will be amazing because you get to see the action, well, potentially seven
times in the men’s race, three times in the women’s. And there’s loads of great viewing spots, technical corners and little climbs, where you could see potential attacks go in crucial moments in the race. There’s also gonna be big screens set up, you’d imagine, and an amazing atmosphere and places to get food and drink. So, that would be my
pick, but to be honest, any of the villages through on the route, they’re gonna be an amazing atmosphere and lots of bunting and great crowds. So, take your pick. (instrumental music) Behind me, is, or I should say was the bridge on Grinton Moore which was washed away by a deluge during a freak storm about a week ago. This is actually on the course for the men’s route in
the World Championships and it hasn’t been decided
at the time of filming what they’re gonna do about it, if they’re gonna reroute it or somehow fix it in time. But the fact that there was
this really bad weather here, it gives you an idea of just what the weather
could do around here. And that’s just one of the things that makes racing here really
challenging and demanding. But to get more of an idea of the other things that make it hard, here’s our very own Chris Opie, who’s gonna tell you about his experiences in the Tour de Yorkshire
over the past few years. – Riding the roads in
Yorkshire, if you don’t know, is kind of unlike anything
else in the world. For a start, the roads,
generally are lined by two dry stone walls, meaning the risk of crashing
has a high consequence. The road service then is seriously grippy, it sucks you in and makes you
fight for every pedal stroke. There’s barely a metre
of flat in Yorkshire and certainly where the
World’s are this year is gonna be really tough
for all the riders. But to help get them through are some of the best crowds on Earth. The Tour de Yorkshire, generally speaking, has crowds that rival
only the Tour de France. – I hope you’ve enjoyed this preview and found it informative. And if you have, then
please give it a thumbs up and share it with your chums. That’s Yorkshire for friends. And also, let us know,
in the comment section, who you think is gonna win
across the various races. Having seen the courses
now, I just can’t wait. I think the race is
gonna be absolutely mega and I’m gonna go for a proper brew now ’cause I’ve got a right thirst on. See you later.

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